When did you start to think about retirement?

When did you start to think about retirement?

Was there a flashpoint for you when you realized you really needed to start thinking about your plan for retirement? I participate in many forms of social media and see everything from family announcements to kitten pictures but I don't ever really see any discussion around retirement. 

 

I first started thinking about retirement when my father in law, Bob, retired a few years ago. That's when retirement pivoted from a passive system of contributing to employer 401(k)'s to I need to really look at how I am doing this. Bob was so confident in what he and his financial planner had put in place and when I think about retirement I just feel, well, anxious. 

 

How about you? How do you feel about your current state of planning?

 

 


------------------
Janice James - W+H Community Manager
BE WELL. BUILD WEALTH.™
Get started in the community.

My goal is to connect people who share a passion for staying well and building wealth to ensure healthy, comfortable futures. Let me know how I can help!
1 REPLY

Re: When did you start to think about retirement?

Oh this question made me laugh. Not because it is a funny post, but because I thought back at the day I decided to start a retirement account. And that was a funny day. It was my 29th birthday. I was scared! and I felt old... One year away from the big 30. Which for me was the pinnacle of turning old. So on my 29th birthday I went and bought my very first anti-aging cream at Sephora and then headed to the bank and asked for a retirement savings account. That day I learned a lot about myself, my investment confidence levels and the fact that I should have listened to my banker 10 years earlier and started a retirement account with only $20 a month contributions. Oh well, maybe in my next life.

 

Today I feel comfortable with my retirement investment levels, but I am trying to build more income security by diversification. Pension plans are basically unheard off today, and 401k and other qualified retirement accounts are prone to stock market fluctuations...and don' t get me started on social security. So I guess more fixed assets, like real estate or jewelry (or precious metals), currency etc. need to also be considered within a retirement planning.